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Ever dream of sleeping under the peaks alongside sharks, stingrays and more?

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IMAX Theater

So real, It's unreal
The huge, six-story screen at the IMAX 3D Theater puts YOU in the action. Travel to undersea reefs filled with colorful creatures, or visit exotic locations from around the world.

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groundhog

Storm Team of Aquarium Animals



Groundhogs and Other Animals
with Weather Folklore 
Chattanooga Chuck, the Tennessee Aquarium’s groundhog, is one of the many animals visitors have a chance to meet up close in Ranger Rick’s Backyard Safari. Most people are familiar with the groundhog’s story – If he sees his shadow on February 2nd, there will be six more weeks of winter. If not, an early spring is expected. But many visitors may be surprised to discover that both Aquarium buildings are home to dozens of creatures with weather proverbs touting their forecasting skills. Stingrays, sharks, catfish, trout and even butterflies have sayings related to their ability to predict atmospheric changes. 

Do screech owls really hoot before it rains? Can parrots foretell a storm? Will frogs call more loudly before showers?

Our experts have taken a look at many of the weather proverbs related to Chattanooga Chuck’s “Storm Team of Aquarium Animals” to see which tales are weather fact, weather fun or weather fiction. Throughout February, guests can learn more about these sayings during animal presentations in Ranger Rick’s Backyard Safari, dive shows, keeper talks and gallery chats.

Before or after your next Aquarium visit, check out these weather proverbs and what our animal experts have to say about their accuracy.
groundhog watching weather map
Thanks to the following Tennessee Aquarium staff members: Christine Bock, lead horticulturist, Dave Collins, curator of forests, Kevin Calhoon, assistant curator of forests, Susie Grant, senior educator, Bill Haley, education outreach coordinator, Bethany Lloyd, outreach educator, Rob Mottice, senior aquarist, Charlene Nash, horticulturist and Jennifer Taylor, entomologist. They helped evaluate the weather proverbs.